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Multi element analysis and mapping
#1
Help.....

Does anyone know of any software that I can utilise to make snappy maps showing the results of multi-element analysis of soil samples. I really need something that allows the (straightforward?) merging of data tables and mapfiles and ends up giving me some kind of raster-related colour-filled result...

Anyone has any ideas (or variations on the theme of ideas), I will be forever grateful.....

[Image: 3334488270_7156e71b8b_t.jpg]

With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
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#2
... Smile now thats a specialist job that one... you could use something like SURFER but that is perhaps not the best. I would be interested to see the comments on this one..

?When a sinister person means to be your enemy, they always start by trying to become your friend.?
William Blake
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#3
I have thought about Surfer, but its not so much a topography map I want, but more a specialised kind of distribution map (with the distribution being the elements ID'd in the soil analysis).

The answer is probably really obvious, but I have not got my 'thinking clearly' head on this evening.

[Image: 3334488270_7156e71b8b_t.jpg]

With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
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#4

sounds abit geochemical, so your talking about layered autoCAD with isometric contouring of the required geochemical measurements.

in terms of showing all the elements on one image, thats more complicated and depends on what your trying to say with the map.

no point in having a map with too much on it.

so personally I'd treat it like OHP layering with RGB.

Any more than those and the colouring will get a bit 'fascinating'?.....

I would try asking a geoarch specialist though, as they will be more informed and up to date on this matter, in terms of current technological limitations / advances.



txt is
Mike
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#5
ArcGIS?
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#6

OHP
over head projector

RGB
red green blue


txt is
Mike
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#7
I suppose it depends on if you just want a series of pretty pictures or want interactive functionality. It sounds like the latter. ArcGIS is only any good if you've already a license. What about GRASS (good w/ raster) or that free open source Spanish one whose name eludes me at the moment? Anyway, both free.
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#8
There is also QGIS

but depends of what you want

?When a sinister person means to be your enemy, they always start by trying to become your friend.?
William Blake
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#9
I think Trowel Monkey has hit the nail on the head. I need to decide if I want more than a pretty picture...

I have ArcGIS and have been advised of one method... which although it makes sense is slightly convuluted and seemingly hit and miss as to whether it works every time. But I guess in the absence of any simpler method it may be the way to go....Thanks for applying your minds to this....

As you can see by the timing of this contribution, this is my problem that isn't going away right now....


[Image: 3334488270_7156e71b8b_t.jpg]

With peace and consolation hath dismist, And calm of mind all passion spent...
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#10
QGIS being the only open source GIS software package I have been able to install on my machine, I would say try it first, get the hang of what it can and can't do (labels are pants in my opinion), then consider looking for something with more poke when you know a bit more about what you want out of your software.

What you can do with QGIS is: have multiple raster map, AP and satellite layers in one project, with the ability to switch between; import csv text files with coordinates and labels; display that data in overlay layers using a wide choice of site markers with an equally wide choice of colours; export your results as a raster file that can be printed directly or inserted into a word processing document.

A fairly simple example would be: scan and georeference a typical upland part of the British Isles at 1:50,000, together with the equivalent geology sheet from the BGS; import and display your data sets for the area e.g. BA roundhouses as yellow circles, BA barrows/cairns as yellow stars; have fun switching between the different layers to analyse the results!

The more I read your post the more it sounds like GIS. So try QGIS first and save yourself pounds if it works. Does in hours what I spent days on illustrating my thesis.
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